1 Memorial plaque at the gates - photo (c) Max ReevesIn the back streets of south London, a short walk from Shakespeare’s Globe, Southwark Cathedral and The Shard, is the site of an old burial ground with an extraordinary history. For centuries it was the outcasts’ graveyard for the area formerly known as The Mint, one of London’s poorest and most violent slums.¬† According to local lore, it was once the final resting place for the Winchester Geese, medieval sex workers licensed by the Bishop of Winchester to work in the brothels of The Liberty of the Clink, which lay outside the law of the City of London.

Shrine at the Red Gate in Redcross Way in 2012 - photo by Katy NichollsBy the time it closed in 1853, Crossbones held the mortal remains of an estimated 15,000 paupers. The eastern part was dug up in the 1990s during work on the Jubilee Line Extension. In 1996, the writer John¬† Constable had a vision in which ‘The Goose’ revealed the secret history of Crossbones. This was the inspiration for The Southwark Mysteries – the epic cycle of poems, plays and esoteric lore performed in The Globe and the Cathedral – and informed the magical works at Crossbones: the creation of a shrine at the red iron gates in Redcross Way, dedicated to ‘the outcast dead’, and now a garden or remembrance.